MobileMe&You: Bots, drones, augmented reality to be featured at national mobile journalism conference

Top digital journalists, innovators, and researchers from universities and news organizations across the nation will lead this year’s MobileMe&You conference, which is set for Oct. 20 and 21 in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

MobileMe&You 2017 is a journalism and technology conference focused on storytelling on mobile media platforms while highlighting new and innovative techniques and best practices to look ahead at newsgathering.

MPI Presents: News Literacy, Fake News and the First Amendment

Join the Mid-America Press Institute Sept. 20 for a one-day seminar on increasing news literacy to better report stories for your audiences.

The one-day seminar — “News Literacy, Fake News and the First Amendment” —  will cover how to recognize and verify news, the role of the First Amendment and how to combat fake news.

New leadership, new home for Mid-America Press Institute

The Mid-America Press Institute, a newsroom training association approaching its fifth decade, has relocated to Champaign, Illinois, and is now under new management.

The move was finalized August 1.

The Mid-America Press Institute, a nonprofit offering low-cost training to mid-career journalists, built its membership from newspapers across the Midwest and had been located at Eastern Illinois University since 1994.

Management of MPI is overseen by part-time co-directors, Brant Houston, the Knight Chair in Investigative Reporting at the University of Illinois, and Pam Dempsey, the executive director of the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting, an online, nonprofit newsroom covering agribusiness and related issues.

Call for Papers: Academic Research track at GIJC17 (Closed)

Investigative and Computer-Assisted Reporting Pedagogical Skills and Techniques

To be presented at the 2017 Global Investigative Journalism Conference at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa.

This is a call for submission of abstracts by May 15, 2017, of no more than 300 words for a short paper and panel presentation at Global Investigative Journalism Conference. Abstracts and papers should be sent to research.papers@gijn.org.

Decisions will be made by June 15, 2017.
Final papers will be due Sept. 15, 2017.

The papers will be compiled in a digital publication for the conference and accepted proposals and presenters will receive invitations to attend to the conference.

Cofounder Steve Berry Rejoins IowaWatch for Student Projects

Steve Berry, the co-founder of The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, is returning to assist students and interns with their projects over throughout the end of April, the center recently announced.

The center’s executive director-editor Lyle Muller explained to IJEC how Berry’s experience both as an educator and a journalist helps the students reach their full potential.

Billion Dollar Story: Campaign Finance in Indiana

With much of the intense scrutiny focused on national campaigns, political financing at the state level can be an afterthought. But state elections constitute an enormous share of the campaign finance complex, and often the reporting and regulation of contributions is lax at best.

Big spenders: What do candidates do with all that money?

When the subject of campaign finance comes up, the focus usually turns to the contribution side of the equation. That is, who’s giving money to politicians, and what do they want in exchange?

No limits: Political action committees pump millions into state elections

The influence of political action committees in Indiana politics in recent years readily can be spotted in the state’s campaign finance database. The largest single contribution, in fact, is from a PAC, the Republic Governors Association Ohio, or RGA Ohio PAC. The organization made a $1 million gift to Mike Pence during his campaign for governor in 2012. RGA Ohio PAC is one of hundreds of PACs that have contributed more than $51 million to Indiana political campaigns between 2010 and 2015, according to the state’s database. Before 2010, the state did not track the type of contributors, and irregularities in the data make it impractical to assess the full extent of PAC activity in the nearly $1 billion worth of campaign contributions since 2000.