Call for Papers: Academic Research track at GIJC17 (Closed)

Investigative and Computer-Assisted Reporting Pedagogical Skills and Techniques

To be presented at the 2017 Global Investigative Journalism Conference at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa.

This is a call for submission of abstracts by May 15, 2017, of no more than 300 words for a short paper and panel presentation at Global Investigative Journalism Conference. Abstracts and papers should be sent to research.papers@gijn.org.

Decisions will be made by June 15, 2017.
Final papers will be due Sept. 15, 2017.

The papers will be compiled in a digital publication for the conference and accepted proposals and presenters will receive invitations to attend to the conference.

Cofounder Steve Berry Rejoins IowaWatch for Student Projects

Steve Berry, the co-founder of The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, is returning to assist students and interns with their projects over throughout the end of April, the center recently announced.

The center’s executive director-editor Lyle Muller explained to IJEC how Berry’s experience both as an educator and a journalist helps the students reach their full potential.

Talk With Us: A Mobile Video Collaboration between Oklahoma Watch and The University of Oklahoma

With the use of mobile video, photos, geographic data and visualizations, students and journalists want to ‘create a conversation about poverty in Oklahoma City between residents of low-income neighborhoods and area leaders.’

The ongoing project has students and faculty from OU’s Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication as well as other university departments and high school students working together with journalists from the nonprofit investigative newsroom Oklahoma Watch.

Billion Dollar Story: Campaign Finance in Indiana

With much of the intense scrutiny focused on national campaigns, political financing at the state level can be an afterthought. But state elections constitute an enormous share of the campaign finance complex, and often the reporting and regulation of contributions is lax at best.

Big spenders: What do candidates do with all that money?

When the subject of campaign finance comes up, the focus usually turns to the contribution side of the equation. That is, who’s giving money to politicians, and what do they want in exchange?

No limits: Political action committees pump millions into state elections

The influence of political action committees in Indiana politics in recent years readily can be spotted in the state’s campaign finance database. The largest single contribution, in fact, is from a PAC, the Republic Governors Association Ohio, or RGA Ohio PAC. The organization made a $1 million gift to Mike Pence during his campaign for governor in 2012. RGA Ohio PAC is one of hundreds of PACs that have contributed more than $51 million to Indiana political campaigns between 2010 and 2015, according to the state’s database. Before 2010, the state did not track the type of contributors, and irregularities in the data make it impractical to assess the full extent of PAC activity in the nearly $1 billion worth of campaign contributions since 2000.

Corporate cash helps fill Indiana politicians’ coffers

On paper, Indiana has a strict cap on campaign contributions from corporations. But in practice, it’s easy for businesses to turn on the flow of money and get around the spending limits.

How the system works – or doesn’t

Under Indiana law, any candidate, party committee, or political action committee must report its contributions and expenses at least once a year (candidate and party committees must file more frequently during election years). Committees file their financial reports with the Election Division either electronically or on paper.